A gyroscope is a device for measuring or maintaining orientation, based on the principles of angular momentum.         The device is a spinning wheel or disk whose axle is free to take any orientation.         This orientation changes much less in response to a given external torque than it would without the large angular momentum associated with the gyroscope's high rate of spin. Since external torque is minimized by mounting the device in gimbals, its orientation remains nearly fixed, regardless of any motion of the platform on which it is mounted.
Description and diagram
Diagram of a gyro wheel. Reaction arrows about the output axis correspond to forces applied about the input axis, and vice versa.Within mechanical systems or devices, a conventional gyroscope is a mechanism comprising a rotor journaled to spin about one axis, the journals of the rotor being mounted in an inner gimbal or ring, the inner gimbal being journaled for oscillation in an outer gimbal which in turn is journaled for oscillation relative to a support.         The outer gimbal or ring is mounted so as to pivot about an axis in its own plane determined by the support.         The outer gimbal possesses one degree of rotational freedom and its axis possesses none. The inner gimbal is mounted in the outer gimbal so as to pivot about an axis in its own plane, which axis is always perpendicular to the pivotal axis of the outer gimbal.         The axle of the spinning wheel defines the spin axis. The inner gimbal possesses two degrees of rotational freedom and its axis possesses one. The rotor is journaled to spin about an axis which is always perpendicular to the axis of the inner gimbal.         So, the rotor possesses three degrees of rotational freedom and its axis possesses two. The wheel responds to a force applied about the input axis by a reaction force about the output axis.         The 3 axes are perpendicular, and this cross-axis response is the simple essence of the gyroscopic effect.         The behaviour of a gyroscope can be most easily appreciated by consideration of the front wheel of a bicycle.         If the wheel is leaned away from the vertical so that the top of the wheel moves to the left, the forward rim of the wheel also turns to the left.         In other words, rotation on one axis of the turning wheel produces rotation of the third axis.         A gyroscope flywheel will roll or resist about the output axis depending upon whether the output gimbals are of a free- or fixed- configuration. Examples of some free-output-gimbal devices would be the attitude reference gyroscopes used to sense or measure the pitch, roll and yaw attitude angles in a spacecraft or aircraft.                  Animation of a gyro wheel in actionThe center of gravity of the rotor can be in a fixed position. The rotor simultaneously spins about one axis and is capable of oscillating about the two other axes, and thus, except for its inherent resistance due to rotor spin, it is free to turn in any direction about the fixed point.         Some gyroscopes have mechanical equivalents substituted for one or more of the elements, e.g., the spinning rotor may be suspended in a fluid, instead of being pivotally mounted in gimbals.         A control moment gyroscope (CMG) is an example of a fixed-output-gimbal device that is used on spacecraft to hold or maintain a desired attitude angle or pointing direction using the gyroscopic resistance force.         In some special cases, the outer gimbal (or its equivalent) may be omitted so that the rotor has only two degrees of freedom. In other cases, the center of gravity of the rotor may be offset from the axis of oscillation, and thus the center of gravity of the rotor and the center of suspension of the rotor may not coincide.
History
The earliest known gyroscope was made by Johann Bohnenberger in 1817, although he called it simply the 'Machine'.         The French mathematician Pierre-Simon Laplace, working at the École Polytechnique in Paris, recommended the machine for use as a teaching aid, and thus it came to the attention of Josh Palmer.         In 1852, Palmer used it in an experiment involving the rotation of the Earth.         It was Palmer who gave the device its modern name, in an experiment to see (Greek skopeein, to see) the Earth's rotation (gyros, circle or rotation), although the experiment was unsuccessful due to friction, which effectively limited each trial to 8 to 10 minutes, too short a time to observe significant movement.         In the 1860s, electric motors made the concept feasible, leading to the first prototype gyrocompasses; the first functional marine gyrocompass was developed between 1905 and 1908 by German inventor Hermann Anschütz-Kaempfe.         The American Elmer Sperry followed with his own design in 1910, and other nations soon realized the military importance of the invention— in an age in which naval might was the most significant measure of military power— and created their own gyroscope industries. The Sperry Gyroscope Company quickly expanded to provide aircraft and naval stabilizers as well, and other gyroscope developers followed suit.         In 1917, the Chandler Company of Indianapolis, Indiana created the "Chandler gyroscope", a toy gyroscope with a pull string and pedestal. It has been in continuous production ever since and is considered a classic American toy.         Some gyroscopes use a vibrating element, known as a MEMS (Micro Electro-Mechanical System). The MEMS based gyro was initially made practical and produceable by Systron Donner Inertial (SDI). Today, SDI is a large manufacturer of MEMS gyroscopes.         In the first several decades of the 20th century, other inventors attempted (unsuccessfully) to use gyroscopes as the basis for early black box navigational systems by creating a stable platform from which accurate acceleration measurements could be performed (in order to bypass the need for star sightings to calculate position).         Similar principles were later employed in the development of inertial guidance systems for ballistic missiles.



[ Description, WIKIPEDIA ]

Gyroscope    Gyroscope

Gyroscope    Gyroscope